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20121201
20121231
STATION
KQED (PBS) 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
and sailors. san francisco will host the america's cup finals next september, but the city has already been gearing up. "newshour" correspondent spencer michels has our story. >> reporter: ever since 1851, sailors and well-healed skippers have raced through the water in ever more expensive, ever-more high tech sailboats in pursuit of the coveted america's cup. to the victor go the spoils, and in 2010 larry ellison, founder of software giant oracle, won the cup for america. ellison's prize, besides bragging rights, was to get to choose where the race would be held next. his choice was to bring the contest to his home waters: san francisco bay. ellison concocted a series of regattas all around the world-- for competing teams from 11 countries-- designed to build enthusiasm and excitement for the main event: america's cup 2013, where 72-foot boats will plough through the bay. these preliminary races featured boats that measure about 45 feet long, with carbonfibre hulls and wing sails, as described by racing announcer andy green. they're the same sailors. they're the same teams, the boats are
francisco chronicle" education reporter. matthai kuruvila, also with the "san francisco chronicle." and paul rogers with "san jose mercury news." the high court announced it will review proposition 8, california's ban on same-sex marriage and the federal defense of marriage act. paul, we'll begin with you. what can we infer from this? what's the time frame? can we expect any sweeping judgments? >> well, a timeframe is the arguments are going to happen in march then we expect a decision by the end of the court session which is june 27th. it will probably go right to the very end. as for how sweeping and how big of a decision we can expect, that's sort of the $64,000 question that court watchers were already speculating about today. are we going to get a narrow ruling one way or another on either one of these two cases or is it going to be one of those once in a generation social civil rights type cases like roe v. wade or brown v.s. board of education? and i think nobody knows. >> how much attention do you think they give to that, to public opinion? where the public stands on an issue? and gr
. we had some minor flooding on the embacadaro in san francisco, lake valley, around lake merr t merritt. basically it was a great opportunity to do tide pooling as well because the high is higher than normal, but the low is much lower than normal. so the people who got out and went to places like fitzgerald marine reserve on the san mateo coast, you could walk much, much further out at low tide. hundreds of yards further than you otherwise would have been able to. it was a great opportunity to teach your kids about, you know, star fish and all the other critters out there. >> will the severity of the king tides be exacerbated by global warming, any time? >> you know, it's interesting, because i think hurricane sandy really woke a lot of people up about the risk of rising sea level in the future for coastal communities. 75% of california residents live within an hour of the coast. and, you know, basically the ocean has already risen eight inches in the last 100 years. we can measure that by the tidal gauge at ft. point in san francisco which has sat there more than 100 years. the
, ross mercurimi -- >> the year got off to a rough start for san francisco's new sheriff, ross mercurimi, facing domestic abuse charges and a suspension. throughout the year, politics took center stage, the presidential election the main event, starting with eight serious republican candidates vying for the nomination. ethnic voters flexed their political muscle, giving president obama an unexpectedly early election night win over republican rival mitt romney. california's public education system was saved from severe budget cuts with the november passage of governor brown's proposition 30, but voters didn't say yes to all taxes. an attempt to tax soda in richmond failed, as did a statewide tobacco tax on the june ballot. new districts drawn by a citizens commission and the voter-approved top two primary system shook up races for congress and the state legislature, putting a record number of freshmen in the assembly and giving democrats a rare supermajority in sacramento. it was the beginning of realignment of the state's criminal justice system, and voters approved reform of the state's
, not that the ninth circuit did but district judge vaughn walker did here in san francisco, that would be the biggest ruling of all. that would have the biggest implication of all. >> because then you would have same-sex marriage in mississippi. it seems like the least likely place to have it, but then it would be a national rule. >> the court may not be ready to take that step against a backdrop where we have nine or ten states that have recognized same-sex marriage but that still comprise a pretty small geographic and even numerical minority. and you may not be able to count california as a true same-sex marriage state because same-sex marriage has come about in california not by virtue of the voters or legislature, but as a result of the federal court. >> there are three months virtually for the first time where voters approved same-sex marriage, so the political, the cultural if not the legal landscape have changed a lot in the past couple years. how does that affect the supreme court? how do they look at all that? >> various justices have made clear that in deciding whether there is a national r
growth. it has been going on at paul's hat works in san francisco's richmond district since 1918, the making of hats. lineage that runs from its peruvian founder over 94 years to four young women from the neighborhood. >> we were kind of an odd bunch before, didn't plan to be hatters, as most people probably don't, and stumbled on it, really did. stumbled on it. and the story and the ambience and that's what took us. >> mike: the story is a familiar one: in 2009, battered by the down economy, the owner needed to sell, no one would buy. so the option was to shut it down, walk away, hat in hand. except in walked a preschool preschool teacher, two costumers and a bookkeeper, saviors in bright colors, with passion. >> we did it because, a, this place was going to evaporate if we didn't. nobody else was going to do it. the four of us are makers of things. we love the craft and we love old crafts and this was something that you can only learn how to be a hatter by apprenticing. so this is a skill that they're not teaching in school. see, this is kind of a taller crown. >> mike: what t
and equity production of it. >> rose: in san francisco. >> in san francisco, and the guy was playing romeo had gotten to juilliard, the had gone to juilliard and going there and i thought, you know, we were there, and he was very talented, i thought, wow, maybe if he got in i could get in and i auditioned and the office only school i awe additioned for at the time and i was very lucky. >> rose: a famous audition, what did you do. >> i did seascapes with sharks and damageser, and my pace was -- it was probably unlike any version they had ever seen before because when i look at it i see the words as very sensual, the way she speaks, give me my romeo, i mean she shall die, take him and cut him into little stars and he will make the face of heaven so fine and all the world will be love with night and never pay any attention to the garish sun, it is building to this almost climax, and also it is about this girl who has just been married, and always been a girl and now she is a woman, she is married and when the sun goes away, the night will be here and so will romeo and she will be a woman. so
vega suffered from mental illness when in his 20s. he is the executive director of san francisco's mental health association and took part in a news conference with legislators to boost support for mental health programs in california and across the country following the newtown shootings. but vega is opposed to the involuntary treatment programs in laura's law. >> i've had some bad experiences in mental health services. there's so many people who, precisely because they're afraid of things like coercion, things like being locked up, being labeled, they don't receive any services, they don't talk to anybody, they become more isolated. >> reporter: vega says that in the wake of a tragedy, politicians often rush to pass unhelpful legislation. >> the laura's law project was driven by this example of a tragedy and spoke to people's needs to want to try to do something different. and in this case it wasn't the right thing. but yet it can be that we rushed to create a solution before really thinking about what the implications are of it. >> reporter: the debate over involuntary treatme
and the ripple effects reached as far west as san francisco. >> after i found out my flight had been canceled after four hours of waiting in the airport, i had to wait another three hour customer service line, which i didn't even get to the end of before the booth closed. >> ifill: about a 1,000 people spent christmas night on cots at dallas/fort worth international airport. by dawn, patience was wearing thin. one fed-up pilot apologized to his passengers over the loudspeaker, after they were forced to wait on the tarmac for almost five hours. >> ifill: by this evening, the worst of the weather was moving into new england. but in its wake, nearly 200,000 customers had lost power across the southeast and midwest, making home for the holidays unexpectedly cold and dark. >> warner: still to come on the "newshour": court-ordered treatment for the mentally ill; deal or no deal; what's next, the view from the muslim brotherhood and massachusetts congressman barney frank. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: toyota motor company agreed today to pay more than $1 billi
's interesting about the fact that a former art student in san francisco is now directing movies like this. what is it about you that likes this kind of challenge? think of the movies you've made. >> it's so hard to answer that. you know i think that there's a kind of responsibility to tell a true story that affects all of our lives and i think that's what motivates me. >> rose: does life and definite motivate you. the movies you make are about life and death. >> there's a gravity at the heart of this piece. there were many lives lost over the course of those ten years. so i suppose a kind of real substantive gravity moves me. and that's really motivating. >> rose: what's interesting -- >> i'm using the only skills that i have to try to express it. >> rose: you said that before about yourself, you felt a sense of mission or responsibility to push the frontiers of the genre. this is a genre and you're pushing the frontiers, yes? >> she's never going to admit to that. >> rose: that's why we're here. you look at that but i know you don't want to appears because you think it's self serving. much
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)